Math Problem Solving Strategy

Math Problem Solving Strategy-76
More recently, teachers have come to understand that becoming mathematically literate is also a complex problem-solving activity that increases in power and flexibility when practiced more often.

Those students who think math is all about the “correct” answer will need support and encouragement to take risks.

Tolerance of difficulty is essential in a problem-solving disposition because being “stuck” is an inevitable stage in resolving just about any problem.

Their questions are designed to help children use a variety of strategies and materials to solve problems.

Students often want to begin without a plan in mind.

Although the teacher needs to be very much present, the primary focus in the class needs to be on the students’ thinking processes.”Students need to have opportunities to work on complex tasks rather than a series of simple tasks devolved from a complex task.

This is important for stimulating the students’ mathematical reasoning and building durable mathematical knowledge (Anthony and Walshaw, 2007).

This making sense of experience is an ongoing, recursive process.

We have known for a long time that reading is a complex problem-solving activity.

The teacher’s role is to construct problems and present situations that provide a forum in which problem-solving can occur.

Our students live in an information and technology-based society where they need to be able to think critically about complex issues, and “analyze and think logically about new situations, devise unspecified solution procedures, and communicate their solution clearly and convincingly to others” (Baroody, 1998).

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